Writing Update October 2019

It’s been awhile since I’ve done a writing update post, and with NaNo on the horizon, I thought now would be a good time.

To begin, let’s talk about Wolf Pit.

Comingsoon

The edits are coming along steadily. My editor was really pleased with the changes I made and said that it has helped with the flow of the story as well as with character development. I should be getting the edits back by tomorrow, and then I’ll go through another round of reviewing the book. Ideally, we’ll edit it a couple more times, then I’ll have a proofreader go through and catch any final errors. While she’s doing that, I’ll print a rough copy just so I can make sure it’s going to come out okay. The deadline might be tight, but I think we’ll make it for the December 14th publication date!

I have a launch party planned at M and M Bookstore on the day of release, so if you’re in the Cedar Rapids area, come visit me and check out the store! I’m still looking for a location in Iowa City to host an evening launch.

If you haven’t read The Purple Door District, and you’re a Wattpad user, I’m currently posting the chapters to the book here. All chapters will be posted before Wolf Pit drops. Or, if you become a patron on patreon, you can read the arc for as low as $1.

The Purple Door District is also a quarterfinalist for the Epic Fantasy Fanatics Reader’s Choice Awards. We’re heading into the final round, and I’m both excited and nervous.

EFF

Anthologies 

I mentioned over the summer/fall that I had pieces chosen for anthologies. Well, one came out yesterday, and the other is coming out at the end of this year. The first is Unknown Realms: A Fiction-Atlas Press Anthology. 

Unknown realms

The anthology includes many incredible authors who tell tales about visiting different realms. My story, “Fae Protection Services” finally found a place to call home.

Blurb: Cadenza Wilde is no stranger to rescuing children from cruel guardians, especially when magic is involved. A fae with magical earth powers, she uses her talents both in her world of Apsaras and in the human realm. When word reaches Cade that children are suddenly going missing, the Pied Piper is her first suspect. And he has his eyes on her charge, Elena. It’s a race against time for Cade to save Elena before the Piper can whisk the child away into his dark realm forever.

You can purchase the kindle version here. Paperback will be coming out soon.

The second anthology I’m proud to announce is Twisted Ever After Anthology by The Otherworld. The anthology focuses on retelling fairy tales in a new and intricate way.

twisted ever after

My story, “Red Moon,” may be one that my patrons remember. It’s a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood with a wolf shifter, a ghostly Huntsman, and a witchy grandmother. This book should be coming out around December in kindle form.

I’ve had a lot of success with short stories this year, and I’m hoping to start writing a mix of them again for contests in 2020. Ideally I’ll focus mostly on urban fantasy, but I have to say that I enjoyed writing a horror story and retelling a fairy tale.

ICON44

ICON44 is Cedar Rapids’ biggest fantasy/sci-fi convention. This year I’ll both be a speaker and a dealer. I’ll be sitting on several panels talking about topics like character development, Game of Thrones, Steven Universe, and more. Throughout the days, I’ll also sell my books and swag in the dealer room. Leading up to the event, I’m going to be signing at Barnes & Noble from 6-8pm with several other authors on Thursday, October 31st (yes, Halloween). ICON lasts from Friday, November 1st, to Sunday, November 3rd. On Friday, November 1st, I’ll also be doing a reading at Half Price Books in Cedar Rapids, so feel free to stop by and say hi! It’s going to be a crazy weekend.

NaNoWriMo

In about two days, NaNoWriMo 2019 kicks off. For those of you who don’t know, during the month of November, writers try to write 50,000 words. I’ve done it about 10 times and won 9 times. This year I plan to work on The Purple Door District Book 3 (currently unnamed). I’m also finishing up Wolf Pit at the same time. Do I think I’ll win? Maybe. All I know is I’m not going to sacrifice Wolf Pit’s quality to meet a word count. At the very least, I’ll get started on book 3 and hopefully figure out the middle of the story. As usual, I know the beginning and the end and that’s it, hah.

Are you participating in NaNo? If so, feel free to add me as a buddy. My username is SilverRose Brighteye.

Happy writing!

 

Preparing for NaNoWriMo

It’s that time of year again. NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, and writers are either outlining their latest and greatest masterpiece or waiting until the last minute when inspiration strikes at midnight. Each year I talk a little bit about NaNo, so I thought I’d share some preparation information that Alex and I wrote for The Writers’ Rooms and has been modified for classroom use. A lot of these tips can actually be used in your everyday writing as well, so even if you’re not doing NaNo, you can still benefit. 

It’s that time of year again. NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, and writers are either outlining their latest and greatest masterpiece or waiting until the last minute when inspiration strikes at midnight. Each year I talk a little bit about NaNo, so I thought I’d share some preparation information that Alex and I wrote for The Writers’ Rooms and has been modified for classroom use. A lot of these tips can actually be used in your everyday writing as well, so even if you’re not doing NaNo, you can still benefit.

If you’re looking to add a buddy to your list, I’m SilverRose Brighteye.

What is NaNoWriMo? 

NaNoWriMo: National Novel Writing Month! Writers get together and attempt to write 50k words (1667/day) in the month of November.  NaNo has spawned a ton of offshoots as well: NaPoWriMo (poetry), NaNoEdMo (editing), and… more (http://www.wikiwrimo.org/wiki/List_of_timed_artistic_challenges)

Camp NaNo: A less-stressful version of NaNo that is held twice over the spring/summer months that allows you to set your own word count or editing goal.

Story A Day: Write one short story a day for the month of May–there’s no word limit, and if you don’t finish your story you move on to the next one at midnight.

YeahWrite: Online community which provides weekly writing challenges, and editorial review with a membership.

52-Week Writing Challenge: Write something (anything!) once a week for a year.

NaNoWriMo Website: https://nanowrimo.org/

Perks of Signing Up on the Website:

  • Finding your community through the Region feature
  • Meeting and friending fellow writers
  • Keeping track of your word count
  • Receiving updates on local group meetups (Iowa City and Cedar Rapids both have NaNo groups).
  • Validating word count and receiving awesome rewards (discount on Scrivener, discounts on editing and publishing programs, etc).

Pre-planning

  • Do your research on your challenge.
    • What are some pitfalls other writers fall into? NaNo usually provides helpful tips through the month on how to get through the challenge.
    • What are your general goals?
    • What resources does NaNo provide?
  • Think about your goals.
    • Are you going to stick hard and fast to the challenge’s goals, or are you going to adjust them for yourself? (ie. will you write 1667 words a day, or will you aim to write more on the weekend to create buffers?)
    • How are you hoping to grow as a writer?
    • What would you like to do with the finished product?
  • Create a schedule.
    • Check your calendar for days you’ll be able to write vs days you can’t get much done.
    • Schedule sleep (seriously, you need rest).
    • Hold yourself accountable.

Resources:

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/nanowrimo-prep-30-tips-resources-strategies-for-writing-a-book-in-30-days

Are you a plotter?

  • Think about how much work you want to do before NaNo starts.
    • Do you want to worldbuild?
    • Do you want to outline?
    • Do you want to create character biographies?
  • Do the structural work.
    • Plan out your daily writing time.
    • Get your Scrivener project (or whatever file system you use) in order and ready for your writing spree.
    • Put together your world-building materials and research so they’re at hand when you’re writing.
    • Have your outline ready to go.

Are you a pantser?

  • Gather inspiration.
    • When it hits you, write down sketches of ideas or characters.
    • Put together a playlist of music for your book.
    • Read or watch works that you’re going to get inspiration from–what has similar tones, settings, or magic/tech systems to your writing?
  • Get ideas together.
    • Set up mini-challenges for yourself for when things get tough.
    • Set up a quiet, inspirational space to write in.
    • Set up self-care plans so you take care of yourself mentally and physically during the challenge.

Resources:

https://www.apronwarrior.com/nano-prep-nano-jar.html

http://pikespeakwriters.blogspot.com/2014/10/your-guide-to-nano-prep.html

Tips During NaNo:

  • Create buffers:
    • If you have days you can write more, fill up that word counter just in case you have to take breaks later on.
  • Participate in writing sprints:
    • NaNo is all about writing and not editing. Schedule 10 minute writing sprints with friends where you race to write as much as you can in 10 uninterrupted minutes.
  • Find a support team:
    • Find friends who write NaNo too so you can commiserate with them when your characters are driving you nuts. Turn to them for support and guidance.
  • Set up writing “meetings”:
    • Set up times for yourself that you treat like meetings. Do homework, clubs, social events around that time so you can be sure to have enough time to write.
  • Don’t Edit:
    • NaNo is a time for writing. You can clean up the language and any errors later one. Editing will slow you down and possibly cause you to lose words.
  • Update Your Word count:
    • Make sure to update your word count every night so you can see the progress you’re making. Even if you don’t think you can make 50,000 words, be proud of the work that you end up doing. Whether you write 2,000 words or 50,000, that’s still more than what you had before.
  • Sleep, eat, and breathe:
    • Remember to go to meals, get rest, and take breaks here and there. A 50,000 word challenge is intense, but you need to take care of yourself.

Productivity Tools

  • Write or Die (or other pressure inducing apps): These apps encourage you to write without stopping, otherwise your text will be erased.
  • (Offtime) app: Disables specific apps on your mobile phone, but allows you to access apps you may still need. Difficult to disable, so it forces you to stay focused. You can use Forest app which allows you to grow a tree while you work and kills it when you stop.
  • (Internet blocker): An online app that will block you from using the internet for a certain amount of time.
  • Motivational posters/memes/calendars: Have these set up in your work area, so if you start feeling stressed or down, take a break and look at those.
  • Musical playlist: Put together music that inspires you to write. You can make specific ones for different stories/books.

Mental Health

  • Take care of yourself. Life gets hard. If you feel like you’re pushing yourself or writing is stressing you out too much, take a break and step back.
  • It’s okay to change projects. You’re not a failure for not completing one before moving on to another. Sometimes we need a change of pace, and there’s nothing wrong with that. NaNo challenges you to write 50,000 words in a month. That doesn’t necessarily mean you have to stick to one project.
  • Don’t let your goals get in the way of you taking care of yourself. The better rested and fed you are, the better you’ll be able to think and write.
  • Reach out to your writing support group when you’re having a hard time so they can remind you that you can do this!
  • Jot down an emergency list of “What to Write When You Hate What You’re Writing”: Specific world building questions, backstory notes for a project, things to research later, or just your feelings on why writing is difficult for you right now.
  • Don’t compare yourself to other writers. Don’t compare your progress to the progress of other writers. Work to your own pace. That’s what matters.

Table Swag

I love attending book conventions, not just because of the books, but because of the swag. Face it, we all love free stuff, but some items catch our attention more than others. So what’s hot and what’s not when it comes to table swag? I reached out to Twitter, Facebook, Google, and used my own experiences and got some interesting answers.

A bit thank you to Jenn Thompson and Indie Author Book Expo (of Des Moines) for inspiring this post with their blog Writer Resources: The Best Book Swag Readers Actually Want. If you haven’t heard about IABE, you really need to check them out. They’re currently running a Kickstarter to help raise money to buy a printing press that will allow them to print other author’s books for cheaper. You can check it out here!

What’s Hot? 

  • Bookmarks: This one had mixed reviews, but the majority of readers leaned towards liking bookmarks, especially if they have interesting art on them. As an author, this can also double as a business card. Make them unique either in style, size, or material.
  • Pens: I can’t tell you how many people have tried to swipe my pens out of poor #yorick’s head! I’ve finally started buying purple pens for people to take when they visit my table. People love things they can use, so this is definitely a hot one.
  • Sand jars/ keepsakes: While these can be expensive, readers really love the sand jars I keep at my table.  I sell mine alongside my book, but, if you can find a cheap creator, this is a great item to give away.
  • Buttons! Believe it or not, but buttons are coming back. Have a nice mix of buttons that people can go through to find the one that they want.
  • Stickers: My stickers have flown off of my table faster than anything else. Some people use logos. I personally have character art on mine, helping to show the diversity in the book. It gives me an opening to talk about my story, too.
  • Themed Swag: You write erotic romance? Maybe provide something with a penis on it (thank you Cassy Albee lol). Is your story music-based? How about giving away guitar picks? Fantasy? Little plastic dragons will hit the spot (thank you Beth Hudson).
  • Candy! Seriously, you should see the people flock to the table when you have a bowl of candy available. I have purple kisses to go along with the color of my book. If you can make little treat bags and put a label with your book info on it, that’s an easy way to get your name into people’s hands. Just as a note, though, if you leave your swag in the car…don’t have chocolate with you.
  • Jewelry: Have a necklace with your book cover on it? A bookmark that doubles as a bracelet (I grabbed one of those really fast). Earrings or bracelets that can promote your work? It’s a great way to get a reader’s attention.
  • Free E-book: This is a wonderful idea if you have a large series and someone’s looking to get started. Have a QR code available at your table that allows someone to get a free e-book. Maybe even provide a sample of your book for free.
  • Mini Journal: You can have either plain ones or have small notebooks with your cover on the front. While the latter might be a little more expensive, it may stay with a person longer.
  • Character Art: Whether on postcards, posters, stickers,  or cards, character art is bound to draw in people’s attention, especially if they can collect them all.
  • Posters of Book Covers: Once again, this is something I sell, but you can also turn it into free swag. Many book covers are absolutely gorgeous and would make a fantastic piece to hang on your wall.
  • Mugs/Tumblers: Who doesn’t like a mug/tumbler, especially with special art, logos, or characters on it? While this can get very expensive, it’s also a great thing to offer in a giveaway. (I may or may not be having a tumbler made for Wolf Pit for a giveaway *wink*).

What’s Not? 

  • Cheap Swag: You get what you pay for, and if your swag is lacking in appearance, color, and quality, it’s not going to leave your table.
  • Swag that Falls Apart: Handmade stuff is fantastic, but again, make sure it’s a good quality. A reader will be disappointed if they take something and it falls apart on them.
  • Glasses or Screen Wipes: These often end up in the trash.
  • Unrelated Swag: Items that have no connection really to the book or to you as an author is sometimes overlooked. There’s a big difference between giving away a generic tube of chapstick and one that actually has art or something themed on it. Even getting a tube that’s the same color as your book can brighten up your table.

Things to Consider: 

  • Budget: As I mentioned, you don’t want to go cheap with your swag, but you want to make sure you stay within budget. Notebooks, mugs, and usb drives are all awesome, but that can really drain a bank account. Find what’s most cost effective and what you can get in bulk. Look for coupons online, too, or check out printing sites on discount days.
  • Where Do I Start? It’s easy to get overwhelmed with the idea of giving away free stuff and finding the best way to make your items. Some places to check out would be Etsy, Vistaprint, Printrunner, Sticker Mule, Discount Mugs, or your local artistic friends.
  • Don’t Stretch Yourself Too Thin: It’s better to have one or two high-quality items than to have several low-quality items. Put your time and effort into focusing on key elements that will help you sell your book.
  • Goals: What’s your goal of having the swag? Do you want to give it away at book events? Are you planning to put them in special giveaways? Know why you’re creating the items and how they’ll help you promote yourself and your book.

Is there any kind of swag that you love or dislike? Feel free to share below!

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and Writing

Fall has finally arrived (despite the 80 degree weather today). Orchard trees are heavy with ripe apples. Pumpkins and Halloween candy already line the shelves. And Starbucks has a line a mile long for a new pumpkin-spice drink.

Oh yeah, and seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is kicking in.

In short, SAD is a type of depression that’s brought on by changes in the seasons. While most people are afflicted during the fall/winter months, there are those, like a few close friends of mine, who struggle with spring/summer SAD. Both are forms of depression, but while winter depression leads to oversleeping, craving carbs, weigh gain, and low energy, summer depression deals more with insomnia, weight loss, and anxiety. Of course, each person is different, and your symptoms may vary.

I can concur, though, that when winter depression starts to set in, I generally want to hibernate. The dream of wrapping up in a warm blanket with hot cocoa and carbs and nesting on the couch with pumpkin bread sometimes gets me through the day, even if it does make me less productive later.

I know there are people out there who don’t believe that SAD is a thing. How can the weather have such a change on people’s moods? Well, if weather changes can lead to someone having migraines, why is it so unbelievable that they can cause depression as well? For winter depression, the longer nights and lack of light tends to set off people’s circadian rhythms in a negative way. I already have trouble sleeping, and winter depression makes it harder for me to get up in the morning to face the next day. I find myself wandering around my house at night, unable to get myself to sleep because I don’t want to face the morning, and then I’m even more exhausted come sunrise, which doesn’t prep me for a good day at work.

The low energy, trouble sleeping, and difficulty concentrating can have a very negative impact on my writing as well. When my brain is snarling with negative thoughts (guilt, worthlessness, hopelessness), sometimes the last thing I want to do is put my fingers to the keyboard. NaNoWriMo can pull me out of that mood for about a month, but then it’s back to me curling up on the couch, not wanting to move or even look at my screen. I’m probably the least productive during my winter months simply because I just don’t have the energy to come up with ideas.

It’s a wonder I’m actually able to launch books in December.

SAD isn’t something to take lightly. When things get bad, it’s not unusual for people to have thoughts of death or suicide. That likely is what pushed me towards my near attempt in February. The depression was just too much to handle, and I slipped over the edge.

So what can you do to combat it? Treatments can include light therapy, medications, or psychotherapy. I started light therapy last winter, and I could tell it made a difference. I set up special light boxes and just sit in their glow for 30-45 minutes everyday. The light is supposed to simulate sunlight, which can help with my circadian rhythm and mood. I’m actually going to start using the boxes again starting today before it gets too dark outside, just so I can start to feel their affects.

I’ve been told, too, that an increase in vitamin D can also help with your mood during winter depression. However, you want to be sure you talk to your doctor about that before you take pills, to make sure you’re not getting too much vitamin D.

Other things to consider if you’re struggling with SAD:

  • Be kind to yourself. You’re not alone in this struggle, so don’t beat yourself up for feeling this way.
  • Create a safe, comfortable environment for yourself. If it means setting up blankets and pillows for you to snuggle in after work, then do that. At least you’ll know it’s waiting for you.
  • Reach out to friends or family if you’re struggling and maybe go spend time with them to get your mind off of the depression.
  • Hot baths or showers, massages, or other things that bring physical comfort.
  • Light-hearted movies/shows. My depression often gets worse if I watch sad stuff, so try to have back-up things you can watch to make you feel a little better.
  • Put up Christmas lights. I know this sounds silly, but I’m always a little happier when I have bright Christmas lights up during the dark months.
  • Keep a journal and write out your emotions. Writing can be very cathartic especially when you don’t understand why you’re feeling so bad.
  • Have the suicide hotline available: 1-800-273-8255 If you feel low enough that you’re afraid you might want to take your life, please call the suicide hotline, visit your local hospital, or reach out to someone you trust. It will get better.

Depression can feel like a dark tunnel without a light at the end, but in the case of SAD, it doesn’t last forever. The changing seasons can bring you relief after a long, difficult episode. There’s no shame in admitting that you’re feeling this way. Like I said, this affects many people, and you’re not alone at all in your struggles. Just know what steps to take to help you safely through it.

Do you struggle with SAD? What kinds of things do you do to help yourself? List them below!