Writing Update October 2019

It’s been awhile since I’ve done a writing update post, and with NaNo on the horizon, I thought now would be a good time.

To begin, let’s talk about Wolf Pit.

Comingsoon

The edits are coming along steadily. My editor was really pleased with the changes I made and said that it has helped with the flow of the story as well as with character development. I should be getting the edits back by tomorrow, and then I’ll go through another round of reviewing the book. Ideally, we’ll edit it a couple more times, then I’ll have a proofreader go through and catch any final errors. While she’s doing that, I’ll print a rough copy just so I can make sure it’s going to come out okay. The deadline might be tight, but I think we’ll make it for the December 14th publication date!

I have a launch party planned at M and M Bookstore on the day of release, so if you’re in the Cedar Rapids area, come visit me and check out the store! I’m still looking for a location in Iowa City to host an evening launch.

If you haven’t read The Purple Door District, and you’re a Wattpad user, I’m currently posting the chapters to the book here. All chapters will be posted before Wolf Pit drops. Or, if you become a patron on patreon, you can read the arc for as low as $1.

The Purple Door District is also a quarterfinalist for the Epic Fantasy Fanatics Reader’s Choice Awards. We’re heading into the final round, and I’m both excited and nervous.

EFF

Anthologies 

I mentioned over the summer/fall that I had pieces chosen for anthologies. Well, one came out yesterday, and the other is coming out at the end of this year. The first is Unknown Realms: A Fiction-Atlas Press Anthology. 

Unknown realms

The anthology includes many incredible authors who tell tales about visiting different realms. My story, “Fae Protection Services” finally found a place to call home.

Blurb: Cadenza Wilde is no stranger to rescuing children from cruel guardians, especially when magic is involved. A fae with magical earth powers, she uses her talents both in her world of Apsaras and in the human realm. When word reaches Cade that children are suddenly going missing, the Pied Piper is her first suspect. And he has his eyes on her charge, Elena. It’s a race against time for Cade to save Elena before the Piper can whisk the child away into his dark realm forever.

You can purchase the kindle version here. Paperback will be coming out soon.

The second anthology I’m proud to announce is Twisted Ever After Anthology by The Otherworld. The anthology focuses on retelling fairy tales in a new and intricate way.

twisted ever after

My story, “Red Moon,” may be one that my patrons remember. It’s a retelling of Little Red Riding Hood with a wolf shifter, a ghostly Huntsman, and a witchy grandmother. This book should be coming out around December in kindle form.

I’ve had a lot of success with short stories this year, and I’m hoping to start writing a mix of them again for contests in 2020. Ideally I’ll focus mostly on urban fantasy, but I have to say that I enjoyed writing a horror story and retelling a fairy tale.

ICON44

ICON44 is Cedar Rapids’ biggest fantasy/sci-fi convention. This year I’ll both be a speaker and a dealer. I’ll be sitting on several panels talking about topics like character development, Game of Thrones, Steven Universe, and more. Throughout the days, I’ll also sell my books and swag in the dealer room. Leading up to the event, I’m going to be signing at Barnes & Noble from 6-8pm with several other authors on Thursday, October 31st (yes, Halloween). ICON lasts from Friday, November 1st, to Sunday, November 3rd. On Friday, November 1st, I’ll also be doing a reading at Half Price Books in Cedar Rapids, so feel free to stop by and say hi! It’s going to be a crazy weekend.

NaNoWriMo

In about two days, NaNoWriMo 2019 kicks off. For those of you who don’t know, during the month of November, writers try to write 50,000 words. I’ve done it about 10 times and won 9 times. This year I plan to work on The Purple Door District Book 3 (currently unnamed). I’m also finishing up Wolf Pit at the same time. Do I think I’ll win? Maybe. All I know is I’m not going to sacrifice Wolf Pit’s quality to meet a word count. At the very least, I’ll get started on book 3 and hopefully figure out the middle of the story. As usual, I know the beginning and the end and that’s it, hah.

Are you participating in NaNo? If so, feel free to add me as a buddy. My username is SilverRose Brighteye.

Happy writing!

 

Preparing for NaNoWriMo

It’s that time of year again. NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, and writers are either outlining their latest and greatest masterpiece or waiting until the last minute when inspiration strikes at midnight. Each year I talk a little bit about NaNo, so I thought I’d share some preparation information that Alex and I wrote for The Writers’ Rooms and has been modified for classroom use. A lot of these tips can actually be used in your everyday writing as well, so even if you’re not doing NaNo, you can still benefit. 

It’s that time of year again. NaNoWriMo is just around the corner, and writers are either outlining their latest and greatest masterpiece or waiting until the last minute when inspiration strikes at midnight. Each year I talk a little bit about NaNo, so I thought I’d share some preparation information that Alex and I wrote for The Writers’ Rooms and has been modified for classroom use. A lot of these tips can actually be used in your everyday writing as well, so even if you’re not doing NaNo, you can still benefit.

If you’re looking to add a buddy to your list, I’m SilverRose Brighteye.

What is NaNoWriMo? 

NaNoWriMo: National Novel Writing Month! Writers get together and attempt to write 50k words (1667/day) in the month of November.  NaNo has spawned a ton of offshoots as well: NaPoWriMo (poetry), NaNoEdMo (editing), and… more (http://www.wikiwrimo.org/wiki/List_of_timed_artistic_challenges)

Camp NaNo: A less-stressful version of NaNo that is held twice over the spring/summer months that allows you to set your own word count or editing goal.

Story A Day: Write one short story a day for the month of May–there’s no word limit, and if you don’t finish your story you move on to the next one at midnight.

YeahWrite: Online community which provides weekly writing challenges, and editorial review with a membership.

52-Week Writing Challenge: Write something (anything!) once a week for a year.

NaNoWriMo Website: https://nanowrimo.org/

Perks of Signing Up on the Website:

  • Finding your community through the Region feature
  • Meeting and friending fellow writers
  • Keeping track of your word count
  • Receiving updates on local group meetups (Iowa City and Cedar Rapids both have NaNo groups).
  • Validating word count and receiving awesome rewards (discount on Scrivener, discounts on editing and publishing programs, etc).

Pre-planning

  • Do your research on your challenge.
    • What are some pitfalls other writers fall into? NaNo usually provides helpful tips through the month on how to get through the challenge.
    • What are your general goals?
    • What resources does NaNo provide?
  • Think about your goals.
    • Are you going to stick hard and fast to the challenge’s goals, or are you going to adjust them for yourself? (ie. will you write 1667 words a day, or will you aim to write more on the weekend to create buffers?)
    • How are you hoping to grow as a writer?
    • What would you like to do with the finished product?
  • Create a schedule.
    • Check your calendar for days you’ll be able to write vs days you can’t get much done.
    • Schedule sleep (seriously, you need rest).
    • Hold yourself accountable.

Resources:

http://www.writersdigest.com/online-editor/nanowrimo-prep-30-tips-resources-strategies-for-writing-a-book-in-30-days

Are you a plotter?

  • Think about how much work you want to do before NaNo starts.
    • Do you want to worldbuild?
    • Do you want to outline?
    • Do you want to create character biographies?
  • Do the structural work.
    • Plan out your daily writing time.
    • Get your Scrivener project (or whatever file system you use) in order and ready for your writing spree.
    • Put together your world-building materials and research so they’re at hand when you’re writing.
    • Have your outline ready to go.

Are you a pantser?

  • Gather inspiration.
    • When it hits you, write down sketches of ideas or characters.
    • Put together a playlist of music for your book.
    • Read or watch works that you’re going to get inspiration from–what has similar tones, settings, or magic/tech systems to your writing?
  • Get ideas together.
    • Set up mini-challenges for yourself for when things get tough.
    • Set up a quiet, inspirational space to write in.
    • Set up self-care plans so you take care of yourself mentally and physically during the challenge.

Resources:

https://www.apronwarrior.com/nano-prep-nano-jar.html

http://pikespeakwriters.blogspot.com/2014/10/your-guide-to-nano-prep.html

Tips During NaNo:

  • Create buffers:
    • If you have days you can write more, fill up that word counter just in case you have to take breaks later on.
  • Participate in writing sprints:
    • NaNo is all about writing and not editing. Schedule 10 minute writing sprints with friends where you race to write as much as you can in 10 uninterrupted minutes.
  • Find a support team:
    • Find friends who write NaNo too so you can commiserate with them when your characters are driving you nuts. Turn to them for support and guidance.
  • Set up writing “meetings”:
    • Set up times for yourself that you treat like meetings. Do homework, clubs, social events around that time so you can be sure to have enough time to write.
  • Don’t Edit:
    • NaNo is a time for writing. You can clean up the language and any errors later one. Editing will slow you down and possibly cause you to lose words.
  • Update Your Word count:
    • Make sure to update your word count every night so you can see the progress you’re making. Even if you don’t think you can make 50,000 words, be proud of the work that you end up doing. Whether you write 2,000 words or 50,000, that’s still more than what you had before.
  • Sleep, eat, and breathe:
    • Remember to go to meals, get rest, and take breaks here and there. A 50,000 word challenge is intense, but you need to take care of yourself.

Productivity Tools

  • Write or Die (or other pressure inducing apps): These apps encourage you to write without stopping, otherwise your text will be erased.
  • (Offtime) app: Disables specific apps on your mobile phone, but allows you to access apps you may still need. Difficult to disable, so it forces you to stay focused. You can use Forest app which allows you to grow a tree while you work and kills it when you stop.
  • (Internet blocker): An online app that will block you from using the internet for a certain amount of time.
  • Motivational posters/memes/calendars: Have these set up in your work area, so if you start feeling stressed or down, take a break and look at those.
  • Musical playlist: Put together music that inspires you to write. You can make specific ones for different stories/books.

Mental Health

  • Take care of yourself. Life gets hard. If you feel like you’re pushing yourself or writing is stressing you out too much, take a break and step back.
  • It’s okay to change projects. You’re not a failure for not completing one before moving on to another. Sometimes we need a change of pace, and there’s nothing wrong with that. NaNo challenges you to write 50,000 words in a month. That doesn’t necessarily mean you have to stick to one project.
  • Don’t let your goals get in the way of you taking care of yourself. The better rested and fed you are, the better you’ll be able to think and write.
  • Reach out to your writing support group when you’re having a hard time so they can remind you that you can do this!
  • Jot down an emergency list of “What to Write When You Hate What You’re Writing”: Specific world building questions, backstory notes for a project, things to research later, or just your feelings on why writing is difficult for you right now.
  • Don’t compare yourself to other writers. Don’t compare your progress to the progress of other writers. Work to your own pace. That’s what matters.

How to Steal Writing Time From a Busy Schedule

In this crazy world called life, it’s often hard to find time to sit down and write. Between work, families, extra-curricular activities, shopping, adulting, etc, when are we supposed to work on our books? Many people say they have stories in their head but no time to put them on paper. I can sympathize, really. I’m usually running around from 8am-8 or 9 pm depending on the day, which leaves only a couple hours to get things done.

So what do you do? How do you steal some time from your busy schedule so you can create your masterpiece?

  • Meeting: Set aside a half hour or hour on certain nights and treat it like you would a work meeting or an appointment. If friends, or work, try to schedule things at that time, calmly explain you have a meeting that you can’t miss. The more you do it, the more comfortable you’ll be at adapting to the new schedule. It could be once a week or several times a week. Either way, it gives you time when you know you can work.
  • Spurts or Sprints: I learned this little trick during NaNoWriMo. You set 10-15 minutes aside, turn off all distractions, and write whatever comes to your mind. Don’t worry about editing or going back to research, just write. Friends of mine and I will hold sprints to see who can write the most in that time frame. It’s a fun little challenge, and it forces you to get text on paper. Likewise, if you find yourself with 10 minutes to spare, use that time to type on your phone or computer, or write in a journal that you bring along. Even if you don’t get a lot out, it may get your mind moving so you’ll be ready to work on your book that night.
  • Record: How many hours do we spend in the car traveling from place to place? How many times have you been in the shower and gotten a great idea but couldn’t write it down? Record yourself. I’ve been on road trips and clicked ‘record’ on my phone and rattled off scenes and story ideas. Even if they’re not directly on paper at that moment, at least I got the idea out of my head and didn’t lose it. There are also speech-to-text programs like Dragon Speech that will record you and type what you say. It takes some getting used to, but it works great if you’re doing dishes or some other task and want to still get the words out.
  • Change Sleep Time: Now, I wouldn’t recommend this if you have insomnia or sleep trouble, but, if you can safely wake up a half hour early or go to bed a half hour later, you can use that extra time to get work done. One of my friends gets all of her writing done between like 5 and 6 am when she’s not being disturbed by anyone. Can you do that too?
  • Lunch Hour: If you get a lunch break at work, that might be a great time to work on writing. Right now, I’m munching on a sandwich and writing this blog entry because I was too tired to write it last night. I still get a break from work, but I’m also being productive with my own craft. But, if you fear you’ll get burnt out, make sure you still take that break.
  • Competitions/Deadlines: Maybe you want to try to push yourself to write because there’s an anthology deadline out there, or a writing contest. I might not write for three months because I know that in November, I’m going to spend 30 days writing for National Novel Writing Month. I pour out 50,000 words, taking more time for my craft that month than usual, because I know it’s only going to last a month. If you set goals for yourself, it might encourage you to find time during a busy schedule.

Whatever you decide to do to get writing time in, remember a couple of things:

  1. You don’t have to write everyday.
  2. Take care of yourself. If you’re burning yourself out writing, you’re not going to enjoy it as much.
  3. Make sure you’re still getting downtime for yourself.
  4. Have fun.

Do you have ways that you fit in writing? Share them below!

Preparing for NaNoWriMo

October is finally here. The leaves are changing color. There’s a crisp chill in the air. Pumpkin spice lattes waft through cafes. And the countdown to NaNoWriMo has begun! Whatever will you do?

Let’s start with the basics. What is NaNoWriMo? This is the abbreviation for National Novel Writing Month, a challenge that writers around the world take on every November. The goal? Write 50,000 words (the length of a short novel or novella) in a single month. You track your words on the official NaNo site, and at the end of the month, you confirm that you reached the word count. If you win, you’re showered with all kinds of awards including discounts on writing programs, editing offers, NaNo swag, and more!

Sounds crazy, right? It’s a daunting task, to be sure, but thousands of people give it a shot each year. I personally have won NaNoWriMo about 8 times, but that’s usually because I prepped through October.

How can you get ready to write your novel during NaNoWriMo?

  • Pantser or Plotter? First, you have to decide whether you’re a pantser (someone who writes by the seat of their pants) or a plotter (someone who outlines a story). What you are will determine how you prep your story. A plotter is more likely to create an outline while a pantser might be more interested in character development or world building. Sometimes, a pantser doesn’t know what he’s writing until the strike of midnight on November 1st, and that’s completely okay. We all work to our own speed.
  • Outline: One of the best ways to prep is to create an outline. It can be a brief sketch of the chapters in the book, a paragraph about the story, or a 10-page long analysis. It’s completely up to you. Having something at the start of NaNo can help give you an edge and guide you when you inevitably get stuck.
  • Character Creation: Who are your characters? How will they act in the story? What do they look like? Knowing the information about your characters before you even get started can make the writing process much easier. You’ll spend less time hemming and hawing over small details and dive right in with your characters.
  • World Building: Whether you’re writing an urban fantasy, a science-fiction adventure in space, or a contemporary romance, your story is going to require world building. Gather that information in October so you know where to start in November. As with character creation, you’ll spend less time wondering what the world looks like and more time writing.
  • Research: If you know you’re going to need to research to create your book, do it in advance of NaNo. This can save you precious writing hours. Jot your notes down, and make certain your information is easily accessible so you’re not wasting time trying to find your research after you’ve already done it.
  • Create a Schedule: If you write 1,667 words everyday, you’ll succeed in completing NaNo. Realistically, though, real life can get in the way of that. Writer’s block, a bad day, sickness, a broken computer can all complicate your schedule and force you to play catch up. One way to prepare yourself is to set up “buffer days” where you’ll have more time to write than usual. Stick to your schedule, and you’ll have a better shot at winning.
  • Schedule Breaks: Not everyone will agree with me on this, but you should schedule breaks during NaNo. You’ll need time to recharge after writing furiously for days on end. It’s okay to take a night to hang out with friends, read, or, heaven forbid, sleep. You don’t want to burn out halfway through.
  • Find Your Region/Support Team: One of the cool features about NaNo is you can connect with people in your area! You don’t have to work on your novel alone. A Municipal Liaison (ML) will set up writing times for people to get together, and that includes October prep. Don’t be surprised if there’s a NaNo kick off right at midnight on November 1st. You can also communicate with one another over the NaNo website and encourage each other. Creating a support team can inspire you to finish your book even when you want to quit.
  • Pep Talk: Prepare pep talks to get you through the tough times, because there will be moments when you’ll want to hurl your book out the window. We face it every yearly, usually around the half-way mark. The NaNo site will provide inspirational speeches from authors, but it doesn’t hurt to have your own positive mantra.
  • Sleep: Seriously, make sure you set up a sleep schedule for yourself for November. And get plenty of sleep in October so you’re rested and prepared for writing. We usually joke about spending every waking moment writing in November, and that’s not too far from the truth. Make plans to take care of your mental and physical health so you don’t burn out or get sick.
  • No editing: NaNo is all about writing, so prepare yourself not to edit. There are no rules against going back and fixing mistakes, but the fun of NaNo is spewing out the story without worrying about grammar or showing vs telling. Editing comes later! Get used to taking off the editor gloves and go ahead and word vomit all over that page (a beautiful image, isn’t it?).
  • Playlists!: Create musical playlists that will keep you focused while you write in November. Maybe you work better with the tv on in the background, or you need a movie soundtrack to hold your attention. Whatever you need to do, October is the time to plan it! I have a playlist that’s nearly two hours long. Each song reminds me of certain characters in my book, thus creating an environment that encourages me to write.
  • NaNo Prep Page: Check out the NaNo Prep Page for more ideas to help you prepare your novel.

Keep in mind, these are all suggestions, and you can use what works for you. NaNo is supposed to be a fun (albeit stressful) event. If you don’t reach 50,000 words, that’s okay! The fact that you wrote anything is an accomplishment. You can do this! Happy NaNo prep to you!

If you have any topics you’d like me to cover (or any more NaNo advice you’d like to know) list them below! Feel free to share your NaNo prep ideas as well!