Marketing Tip: Street Team

This week’s marketing topic was inspired by Byrd Nash’s instagram post about street teams. Be sure to check out her many writing tips, as well as her new book:

Wicked Wolves
Find it on Amazon.

To start off, what is a Street Team? This is essentially a group of people who are your go-to folks for marketing your book. They’re the ones who share your posts on social media, leave book reviews, provide writing feedback, etc. They’re the backbone of your whole marketing plan who can help get the word out about your novel. I’ll go more in-depth in a moment, but one thing to keep in mind is that these people are usually volunteers who take time out of their day to help you promote. Treat them with kindness and respect and understand that sometimes they can’t always be “on” to help you. Some of my street team folks, like Brian K Morris, are there to provide me with moral support when I feel kicked down, and I can’t appreciate it enough. So be kind.

Why Have a Street Team? 

Whether you’re trade or indie, you’re going to have to do some marketing for your book. As an indie author, I wear the hats of the writer, editor, proofreader, designer, marketer, website creator, book signing scheduler, etc. It’s a lot of work. But, as I’ve expressed in many blogs, you don’t have to go it alone. The street team helps take some of the burden off of your shoulders. When you need to reach a wider audience, they’re there to spread the word. You can’t beat having a lovely group of people to help you.

Who Are They? / Where Can You Find Them? 

Honestly, your street team can be anyone. Family. Friends. Editors. Fans. They should be people you trust who have shown interest in your book and your journey.  They may even be fellow writers that you’ve met on twitter or instagram, or during writing conventions. Be sure to ask them before you add them to your street team, though. People don’t like being bombarded with information that they never asked to receive. One way you can keep track of who’s on your team is by creating a facebook group specifically for them. I have a group called The Purple Door District: Street Team! where I share my information. Generally, my street team is the first to see new content before it goes out to the rest of the public. Interested in becoming part of my street team? Let me know!

Arc/Beta Readers

One way the street team can help is by volunteering to either become a beta reader or an arc (advanced reader copy) reader. They’ll read your book and provide feedback about possible things you need to change to help make your story stronger. Specifically ask them to review topics/plots/characters you’re most concerned about because your beta/arc readers will be your last line of defense before you go public.

Reviews

Having people willing to leave reviews is so important for an author. Like it or not, the algorithms on Amazon will determine how your book gets promoted. The more reviews you have, the more likely Amazon will be to share it around. I believe the key number is 50 reviews, but frankly, any amount helps. Reviews don’t have to be complex, either. Your street team can leave a rating and something as simple as a one word review. Granted, getting a full review is wonderful, and I wouldn’t snuff that if they’re willing to do it. I’ve had some excellent reviews from Ellen Rozek, Byrd Nash, and Shakyra Dunn for example. The best ones are when the readers are willing to provide constructive feedback along with their kind words.

Social Media Sharing

Another way your street team can help you is by sharing important news about your book across their social media platforms. The more people you reach, the better chance you have of selling your book, or acquiring followers. They can share things like cover releases, book releases, giveaways, or, hey, even your quest for a reader’s choice award. Be sure to give them ample notice and all the information that they need to share your news around. While you may have some of the same friends, chances are all of your street team members will have an audience that you don’t know. The more platforms you can get across, (twitter, facebook, instagram, goodreads, allauthor, bookbub, etc) the better.

Book Buyers

Now, let me be clear, just because someone is on your street team, that doesn’t mean they’re obligated to buy your book. But, it is a nice perk if it happens. Likely your street team members are readers themselves and are interested in your book or want to go the extra mile and support you by buying your novel. Can’t say no to that, right? Be sure to interact with them and the rest of your book-buying audience. Let them know how much you appreciate them for helping you.

These are just a few ways that a street team can help you, especially near a book launch or book release day. Do you have a street team? How have they helped you? Feel free to share your story below!

On another note, I really am working to get nominated for the Epic Fantasy Fanatics Reader’s Choice Award. If you have a second, please consider voting for The Purple Door District. Thank you so much!

 

Pride

Today was a milestone in my life. I arrived home and found a package waiting for me in the mail.

It was the proof of my book.

Emotions flooded through me. Excitement. Fear. Anxiety. Pride. I’ve spent so many months writing, revising, and preparing this book for publication, I just didn’t know how it would turn out. I could open the box and find a beauty or a beast. What if I hated it? What if it didn’t live up to my expectations? What if I screwed up the formatting? What if…

I think the smile here says how I feel.

thebook

This has been quite the journey, and though it’s nowhere near over, getting this far has been an adventure in and of itself. I decided in June that I was going to publish The Purple District. I’d been posting it on Patreon for about 7 months at that point, and I realized that the book could actually go on the market.  I knew it would be a lot of work to edit, proofread, format, market, etc, but I didn’t realize just how crazy things would get, and how fast that time would fly. Nor did I realize how it would impact me mentally.

Most people don’t know what goes on behind the scenes when an author creates a book. You see their marketing strategies and the final products, but not the struggles along the way, or the self-doubt. I pride myself on being a pretty honest and open person, and I’m not lying when I say that there were several times I wanted to quit the book. I cried, I screamed, I threw my hands up in the air and said, “why bother? It’s never going to be good enough.” I went through the typical thing all authors do; I thought my work was trash and didn’t deserve to see the light of day. My editors and beta readers said otherwise, of course, and that gave me the courage to keep going.

But deep down, there was another fear. For the first time I was going to put a big part of myself out there to be read, reviewed, judged, enjoyed, hated, whatever the feelings might be. Part of me didn’t feel like I deserved the honor of having a published book. Part of me felt like I was ready to take on the responsibility. Today? I’m just proud to be able to hold the book in my hands and realize that made this. I didn’t do it alone, of course, but I had the strength and courage to see the book through.

It’s a surreal feeling. I almost don’t believe that I’m holding the book in my hands. Sure, there are flaws and there are things I need to fix, but I’m one step closer to being a published author. This opens the door to literary events, conventions, readings, and signings. I’m terrified to launch into this new world, but I crave it as well. Failure is always gnawing at the back of my mind. What if I mess up? What if I don’t do enough? What if I just…fail?

I guess in the end, it doesn’t matter because look how far I’ve come. Even if people hate it or it doesn’t sell well, I still did it. I still put in the time, effort, love, tears, and dedication to produce this piece of work, and that in itself is an accomplishment and something I should take pride in.

I guess I want people to remember to take a moment and feel pride in themselves and their work. Whether you’re just starting, you’ve created short stories, written full novels, or published your books, you’re all authors. You all have dedication to the craft. Be proud of that. Look at your work and realize, “I did this.” It doesn’t matter how big or how small it is. You still created it. Hold on to that feeling so that you can go back to it when you have moments of self doubt. And remember, you’re not alone. We all struggle with it and we all wonder, “Am I good enough?”

I think you are. Keep writing, keep creating, and keep shining. Be proud of yourself, because I’m proud of you.

And like I say on my dedication page, to anyone who feels alone or needs a community…welcome to the District.

 

You can pre-order the book here (paper will be available shortly): https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07K5JPRNM

 

Marketing Vs Writing Time

I think the favorite motto of a writer is, “I hate marketing my book.” Most times when I ask someone about their marketing techniques, they talk about how much they despise it and would rather have someone else do it. Unfortunately, whether you’re traditionally published or self-published, you will have to do a fair bit of marketing if you want your book to succeed. The question is, how much time do you put into marketing vs your writing? Obviously you won’t have anything to market if you don’t write!

Here are a few tips and ideas I’ve learned about when to market vs when to write and how to divide your time.

  • Feeling inspired? Put the marketing aside and get those words down on paper. Don’t squander time if you’re feeling creative.
  • No Inclination to Write? Then focus on marketing. Sometimes putting together graphics or sending out tweets/building your reading and writing community can help you break out of that creative fog.
  • Deadlines for Books: If you have short stories due for contests, or a book due for printing, put the marketing aside and focus on getting that done. You want to make sure you meet those deadlines so you can market it later.
  • Deadlines for Interviews/Guest Spots: If a site or station is waiting on your interview or a guest blog, for example, then make that your priority. You might have to put your writing aside just to make sure you get that deadline done. Remember, this will give you traction and bring more people to your website.
  • Long Break: Do you have a few hours during the day where you can sit and focus on your book? You might consider writing. While marketing can take hours to do, it’s easier to get that done in shorter spurts of time than working on your novel.
  • Short Break: Are you waiting at a doctor’s appointment? Do you only have a few minutes to relax before a meeting? Spend that time marketing. Post a tweet. Share information about your book. Check your e-mail. It’s easier to do that than to get writing done.
  • Split time: Maybe you want to market and write in the same day. Create meetings for yourself. From 6-8, you’ll work on writing. From 8-9, you’ll work on marketing. Treat those like meetings that you can’t miss. That means you can get both done!
  • Author Events: When you have an author event coming up such as readings, signings, tours, you want to spend most of your time marketing. Share your event to the community you’ve built up. Focus your tweets and Instagram posts around what you’ll be doing. At the same time, post pictures while you’re at the events! Not only will you be preserving memories, you’ll also be sharing your experiences with your readers. This is a time to focus on the marketing and getting to know the crowd, not the writing.
  • Burnout: At some point you’re going to burn out from writing or marketing. When one fails, turn to the other. Usually if I’m too tired to write, I can still market my stuff. I might engage in a twitter thread or post a couple of pictures on Facebook and Instagram because it doesn’t take a lot of energy. Sometimes, trying to share yourself with the social world can be draining. When you feel worn out, settle in, turn off social media, and just focus on your book. And, if you hit a point that you can’t do either, take a break. Allow yourself to breathe and come back to it another day. If you keep pushing yourself, you won’t do well with either your marketing or writing.
  • Scheduling: Each week, create a schedule for yourself. Decide what’s most important (writing or marketing), and jot down the days you want to do one or the other, or both. Having this routine set up can make the whole process a lot easier and more friendly for yourself. Scheduling marketing posts is helpful too. You can take a day to schedule posts/blogs/interviews, and then while those launch, you can work on your writing.
  • Check in with yourself: Check in frequently to see how you’re feeling. If you’re starting to feel too overwhelmed with writing or marketing, it may be time to switch up your schedule. You are in control. You have the power to do as much or as little as you want. Make sure you’re being kind to yourself and taking it all one step at a time.
  • Create Shortcuts: Find ways to get multiple kinds of marketing done at the same time so you have more time to write. For example, use hoot suite or another platform that allows you to schedule and set up multiple posts at once. The site posts for you while you write. Or, schedule a blog post on a Tuesday and have that be your “marketing piece” that you share that day. By 9am, you may be done with your marketing. While views are rolling in on your blog, you can go back to writing.

A lot of this really depends on where you are mentally and what needs to get done. If you’re itching to write, then write. If you’re craving social media, focus on that. And if you find that you’re struggling in one of those areas, then make sure you set up time that you can sit down and focus on publicizing or writing your work.

It’s likely authors hate marketing because either 1. they aren’t sure how to do it productively, 2. they don’t like stealing away from their writing time, 3. they don’t like talking about themselves, 4. it’s just not their forte. If any of this is true for you, you may want to look into finding someone who can market your work for you. That way you can spend more time writing.

I hope this helps!

If you have any topics you’d like me to cover, please post them down below!

Mental Health and Writing

I’m no stranger when it comes to depression and anxiety. I walk with them, hand in hand, everyday of my life, and sometimes I get dragged along, kicking, screaming, and crying. The US is notorious for looking down on those with mental health. We’re supposed to suck it up and be strong, but really, that creates more problems in the end. So when the world gets to be too much, I turn to therapy writing and reading.

Everyone uses writing in a different way to help themselves. Some write journal entries, spewing out their emotions so they don’t have to hold them so heavily in their hearts. I write violent scenes so I can feel something other than the pain inside of me. Poetry, short stories, novels…they can all help because they give you something else to focus on.

If you want to deal with the problem or emotions you’re going through, use therapeutic writing as a chance  to center on the issue. Write down how you feel and what events have led you to those negative emotions. As you do this, you might see patterns form. Maybe you’re not getting enough rest and that’s causing problems, or a new stress was added into your daily life. Whatever it is, remember, your feelings are valid. You’re allowed to be upset, and it’s good to take the time to work through your issues.

Poetry can be helpful, too. Splatter your page with the rushing thoughts in your head and see what you create. You can always go back to it later if you want to adjust the rhythm, rhyme, or form. There’s also nothing wrong with writing the poem for your eyes alone. Don’t worry about editing or how the words might sound. Let them flow and see if that helps alleviate some of the stress. Some of my best pieces have come out when I’ve been at the peak of depression.

Working on my novel can be very therapeutic too because it gives my brain something else to focus on. I have a huge issue with stress eating; I always have. So if I feel depressed or overwhelmed, I try to turn to my computer instead of grabbing a bag of chips or cookies. Does it always work? No, but more and more I find myself sitting down to my work instead of eating, and I consider that a success.

Right now, I’m in a hospital getting treated for cellulitis. Deep down, I’m scared, angry, and frustrated with myself, but I know those emotions aren’t going to help me heal. So I’m keeping my mind and hands busy by writing this blog to you. My body is resting and my brain is getting a break from fretting over the pain and stress.

I’ve said many times that it’s important to take care of yourself when you write. Writing can, at times, be the healer we need to get through stress, depression, grief, and more. Find what works for you. If you have any suggestions on how to use writing for healing, post them below! The best way to help each other is by sharing ideas.

Your feelings are valid. YOU are valid.

Happy writing.

Writer Burnout

It’s fitting that I’m writing about this topic since I’m dealing with writer burnout myself. Let’s try some real talk. As a writer, no one is harder on you than yourself. You push yourself to write, edit, market, publicize, etc. When you publish a book, you wear all these hats, and you tell yourself you have to keep going every hour of the day. If you stop, what if you miss an opportunity? What if people think you aren’t working hard enough? What if you don’t meet a deadline? What if–

You snap.

Suddenly the world crashes down and you don’t know where to go, or who to turn to for help. Ideas vanish. You sense the start of a panic attack. Nothing you do feels right or enough. And sometimes, you just go numb because it’s all too much to deal with.

This hit me last week, and I’m slowly crawling my way out of it the depths as I write this blog while sitting in a Panera. One moment I was up and productive, and the next I was curled up in my bed, unable to move from complete mental and physical exhaustion. Last week, the only strength I had was to go to work then come home and sleep. I knew I should put up posts, tweet, be interactive with the community, edit, write, etc but I couldn’t bring myself to do it. I opened a blank page on my computer, and I almost burst into tears because plucking ideas out of my head was like tearing at an infected scabs.

Not exactly a delightful image, but it’s the best way I can describe it. I was surviving on caffeine and doing everything I thought I could to edit and promote my book. The one important thing I forgot to do? Take care of myself.

When you get to the point that even opening a Word document makes you sick to your stomach, it’s time to step back from the page. You’re allowed to skip a day of editing, writing, and marketing. You’re allowed to get more than a couple of hours of sleep at night. And you are allowed to take care of yourself.

So what do you do when writer burnout hits you? Here are a couple of tips.

  • Sleep: If you’ve been falling asleep editing/writing your manuscript at night, it’s time to step back and go to bed. Your body and brain will thank you. Even better, it’ll refresh you.
  • Shut Down Social Media: It’s not the end of the world if you’re not on twitter/facebook for a day. My favorite thing to do is to shut off my phone and put on a good movie that makes me happy.
  • Do Something Else: Try another hobby that’s not writing related. Go on a short trip. Hang out with your friends. Allow yourself to enjoy the rest of your life while you recover.
  • Take Personal Time: On the flip side, if going anywhere is too exhausting, then rest at home. Read a good book. Listen to music. Cuddle your cat or dog or bird (in my case). Focus on self care. If you don’t mind your body, how do you expect to keep going?
  • Take a Mental Health Day: Whether it’s from work (if able) or from social events, just back out and do something for you. Get a massage. Cuddle up in warm blankets. Allow your brain to rest. Getting rid of the regular stresses might help you recharge.
  • Write Something Else: Believe it or not, sometimes if you have writer burnout, it may be due to a specific project. Try switching it up and write something that inspires you, whether it’s a short prompt, or a fun story you’ve had stuck in your head.
  • Be Kind: I can’t stress this enough. Be kind to yourself and realize this happens to everyone. Taking a break doesn’t make you a bad writer; quite the contrary. It means you’re being responsible for yourself. When you break your arm, you give it time to heal. You have to do the same thing when your muse breaks, so please, be kind to yourself.
  • Remember it Doesn’t Last Forever: When you get into this state, sometimes it’s hard to see a light at the end of the tunnel, but it’s there. Sure, there might be some smoke or shadows blocking it, but you’ll find your way to it, and your writing spirit will ignite again.
  • Make a Schedule: When you feel like you’re ready to jump into the fray again, take it slow. Create a schedule of things you want to do to get yourself up and running. And check off the things you accomplish. It’s a great feeling.

Please take care of yourself, my friends. It’s just as important to keep your mind healthy as it is your body.

Writing With Anxiety

Let me paint a picture for you. It’s the middle of the night, and you’ve just completed a chapter in your book. When you crawled into bed, you were excited with your progress. But as the clock ticks on, you start to dread what’s on paper. What if it doesn’t work? What if it’s not good enough? What if I’m not good enough? What if I can’t cut it as an author? What if I’ll never get published? What if—

I’m pretty sure I’m not alone when I say that anxiety sucks. It’s horrible for everyone, but as a writer, it’s something that niggles at the back of my mind everyday. Even as I write this blog post I feel its cold claws digging into my shoulders. Will this help anyone? Am I making sense? Will anyone read it? What’s the point?

The point is is that I’m sharing a story with you and revealing a part of myself that a lot of others might keep hidden. Our country is notorious for turning its back on those with depression, anxiety, and many other mental illnesses. You’re called weak if you cry or share your feelings, or you’re told to toughen up.

Well, I’m here to tell you that your feelings are valid. It’s okay if you think you’re not the best writer. It’s fine if you think you’ll never publish anything. You’re allowed to feel all these things… for a moment. What you do with that energy is what’s most important. Will you let it stop you? Or will you use it to push forward and be the best that you can be for yourself?

Even the greatest writers feel like they were 1. the worst at one point or 2. they still feel that way. We are our own worst critics. Your book may not be perfect, but that doesn’t mean it’s the end. Take the time to polish it. Work with someone you trust to go over the manuscript and make it better. Or, put the writing away for a day or two, take a breath, then return to it with a fresh mind and heart. Feel… and then move forward.

Here are a couple of things I do when my anxiety consumes me as I’m working on my novel.

  1. Breathe. Really, just close your eyes and breathe in and out.
  2. Step away. If you start hating your work, then it’s time to back away from the computer or notebook and take a breather.
  3. Work out or do something else active. Get that serotonin moving again and let your brain rest. You might be overworking it.
  4. Do something else creative. It’s perfectly fine to have another hobby to focus on when your writing gets to be too much. Researchers actually encourage it especially during moments like these.
  5. Support. Reach out to a support group. Post on twitter, facebook, instagram, wattpad,… wherever you feel safe. Believe me, someone else will be going through the same thing.
  6. Be kind to yourself. Remind yourself that your writing doesn’t have to be perfect. You can always edit later. And if editing is the problem, then write for a little bit. Just try not to beat yourself down for it. You’ve got this.
  7. Use your coping skills. Whether it’s taking your medication regularly, or doing yoga/meditation, take time to treat yourself mentally, so you can get back to the thing you love.

Anxiety is an awful thing to deal with, but it’s not impossible to work through it and keep writing. Even if you don’t believe in yourself, other people do.

I do.